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Pathways in Teaching: Feldenkrais Jo Horder

  • 4th December 2016 - 4th December 2016
  • 2.30pm-5.30pm
  • Cardiff University School of Music

We musicians, and our students, are likely to be sitting when we play in ensembles and orchestras. We often have to cope with unsuitable chairs and cramped conditions.

In this workshop you will explore how you normally sit, and how your sitting habits may be effecting your ease and enjoyment when you play. You will have the opportunity to develop a dynamic balance in sitting which can support and liberate your relationship to your instrument. Improved sitting can also address issues of pain and fatigue.

You will go on to explore how you use your arms and open up pathways to easier movement which can liberate your potential to express yourself through your playing. You will relate easier movement of the arms to what you have learnt about dynamic balance in sitting.

This will be a relaxed, non judgmental, explorative workshop. I will lead you through gentle and easy movement sequences which are designed to increase your awareness of unconscious habits and open up fresh possibilities for change and improvement.

Bring your instrument for a simple and direct “before and after” experience. Go away with tips and strategies to help you and your students sit and play more easily.

The Feldenkrais Method uses movement to change the brain, to refresh our self image, to help us learn and improve, and to discover our full potential. It is named after its extraordinary originator, Moshe Feldenkrais (1904-1984), whose background as engineer, physicist and judo black belt led him to formulate this educational method which so effectively connects brain and body.

For further information please visit www.feldenkrais-westherts.co.uk or  www.feldenkrais.co.uk

 

Feldenkrais offers a unique and practical way to realise our potential more fully. It is an educational method focusing on learning and movement, which can bring about improved movement and enhanced functioning. It is named after its originator, Moshe Feldenkrais (1904-1984), an engineer and physicist as well as a Judo teacher.

What are the benefits?
• Relief from tension and muscular pain
• Easier and fuller breathing
• Greater relaxation and well-being
• Improved performance in sport, dance, music and drama
• Greater ease in everyday activities
• Increased vitality

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